Bird Weekly – Photo Challenge – Birds with Butts in the Air

Welcome to Week #31 of the Bird Weekly Photo Challenge. Week #31 challenge is Birds with butts in the air….giving us their “moon shot”.

The feature image showcases a pair of butts belonging to a couple of Blue-winged Teals. This pair stayed down more than they stayed up. I guess there was plenty of food under the surface for them.

Dabbling ducks is what came to mind when I set this challenge. They frequent ponds and shallow water for tasty vegetation. Among these ducks are American Black Duck, American Wigeon, Blue-winged Teal, Cinnamon Teal, Eurasian Wigeon, Gadwall, Green-winged Teal, Mallard, Mottled Duck, Northern Pintail, Northern Shoveler and Wood Duck.


I will keep this info up for a few weeks.

Before we plan our birding trips, we scour the many lists on Ebird.org to see what has been seen and logged in recent days. If you don’t use Ebird and want to get out there and find them, I suggest using this site or download the app to your phone. The data you submit goes directly to CornellLab of Ornithology. Birds are logged by birders and scientist all over the world.

Steps to a Great Day of Birding

  • Log on to Ebird.org site. Free to create an account.
  • Click on the Explore tab at the top and then click on Explore Hotspots.
  • Find our favorite hotspots within a few hours drive and look over the lists.
  • Create an agenda on where we are going. Usually verbally, nothing fancy or written down. We do this a day or two before we want to go.
  • Pack a lunch, snacks and several thermoses of water as there are almost no places to eat where we go. Some are driving trails and some are hiking trails. Many of the them are a little of both.
  • Take a notepad & pen to write down the birds as we see them. Old school, however the new Ebird app has a feature that you can start a list, add your birds as you see them in a specific area and it will record the whole time you are in that area. When you are finished birding in an area, you can then complete the number of each species, complete the data and finish recording until you get to the next spot. It records the time you start and finish so you don’t have to do that manually. I’ve used it once and loved it, but when I’m out there, it is pretty easy for me to write them down. For me, it’s a mental exercise.

Northern Pintail

Northern Pintail with its butt turned towards the camera among some Blue-winged Teals at Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge.

Northern Pintails are long-necked ducks and the breeding males have a very long tail, white breast and white neck. The female has a long tail and is a brown mottled color. They are larger than many ducks at 20-29 inches (51-76 cm). They often migrate with other ducks like the Blue-winged Teal and American Wigeons seen in the photos here. They can be seen on every continent except Australia and Antarctica but are prominent in North America, Asia and Europe.

Northern Pintail among some Blue-winged Teals at Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge.

Providing you with the head shot of the Northern Pintail male shown above was seen here with a cluster of Blue-winged Teals showing their butts off on the right.


Blue-winged Teal

Blue-winged Teals foraging in a pond at Sweetwater Wetlands Preserve in Gainesville, Florida.

Blue-winged Teals are long distance migrants that mainly inhabit North America migrating down into South America. They can be found in Europe and Africa as well. These dabbling ducks take off earlier than other ducks during spring and fall migration, leaving their breeding grounds in the United States and Canada before other species in the fall.


American Wigeon

American Wigeon with butt in the air among some Redheads in a large pond at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge near Tallahassee, Florida.

The American Wigeon has a gooselike bill and can eat more plant matter than any other dabbling duck. Watch closely when you are out birding because the Eurasian Wigeon can be a rarity that shows up with the American Wigeon during migration to North America. Same goes with the American Wigeon. This bird has been known to take flight with the Eurasian Wigeon and turn up in Europe. So nice that they get along!

American Wigeon in a large pond at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge near Tallahassee, Florida.

Common Gallinule

Common Gallinule feeding along the water line in some mangroves at Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge.

I gave you a Common Gallinule last week, but this one fit the bill or “butt” this week. Even though the light was bright, it did offer a pretty good reflection. This Gallinule or Moorhen as they were once known, was feeding along the banks of the Mangroves at Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge.


Feral Muscovy Duck

Domesticated Muscovy Duck hanging out at the cemetery in Jacksonville, Florida.

True Muscovy Ducks are rare in the United States. Like the Mallard, it has become feral and domesticated residing in parks and on farms. True Wild Muscovy Ducks are restricted to South Texas and further south into Mexico, Central and South America.


Wood Storks

A flock of Wood Storks at a golf course in Tampa, Florida.

Wood Storks are large gangly birds and stands just over 3 feet tall (91.44 cm). Wood Storks range is mainly in the United States, Cuba, Central and South America.


American Avocet

American Avocets, with their butts in the air, scouring for food at Henderson Birding Preserve near Las Vegas, Nevada.

The American Avocet can be found in shallow wetlands like this pair seen at Henderson Birding Preserve near Las Vegas, Nevada. They are usually out in the open with little vegetation to hide them. They have a high-pitched call that gradually rises in pitch, simulating a Doppler effect when threatened by a predator. This technique can make it seem like their approach is faster than it actually is.

American Avocets scouring for food at Henderson Birding Preserve near Las Vegas, Nevada.

Willets

Willets feeding along the shoreline at Fort Desoto Park in Pinellas County Florida.

Willets are one of the most common shorebirds across North American, Mexico, Central and South America. When threatened, Willets will pretend to be disabled with a broken wing to draw attention to themselves to draw a predator away from their nest. They have an unmistakable call, pill-will-willet which gives them their name.


Upcoming challenges can be found on my Bird Weekly Challenge Page.

Next time…Week #32 – Birds with Brown Feathers.

Bird Weekly Round-Up – Week #30

Week #30 challenge was Birds starting with the letter “C”.

Disclaimer: If anyone has an issue with me using their photos in the round ups, please kindly let me know. I haven’t had anyone say anything, but I don’t want you to think I’m using your photographs for personal gain. I’m here to show what great work you are doing with your photography by showing you off in these posts.


What a lucky week this was. I couldn’t have planned it any better than I did if I had tried. Since I set the challenges pretty much at random with little planning, to actually see birds that match the theme for the week that I saw them was pretty incredible. Given the fact that I saw a Cinnamon Teal and Canvasback on two separate birding adventures in different parts of Florida for the weekly challenge was mind blowing. The Cinnamon Teal was seen south of Jacksonville near Cape Canaveral at Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge (2 1/2 hour drive one way). The Canvasback was spotted in the pond adjacent to the St. Marks Lighthouse at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge near Tallahassee, Florida (3 hour drive one way) which is west of Jacksonville. Both were day trips. We got up at dark-thirty and got home late but before midnight on both trips.

Y’all outdid yourselves with your “C” birds. New birds that I would only see here were shared. There were some technical glitches this week. Two of you I didn’t get your pingback but luckily I found your blogs. I hope there were not others.


Welcome to the newcomer Tracy.

I encourage you to visit these blogs if you haven’t already and see what amazing things they have going on. If I missed your post or there was a problem with a pingback, please let me know and I will be glad to add you to the list. Remember to pingback from my post of that week and not my page. Liking my page is encouraged!


Next up: Week #31: Butts in the Air! Please try to identify what you saw if possible. If not, this will be a photos of “moon shots” of random birds. LOL!

VISIT MY BIRD WEEKLY PAGE FOR A FULL LIST OF UPCOMING CHALLENGES AND RULES!

I look forward to seeing your creations this week!

SQUARES – Upright

This fishing pole is upright with no fish on the hook. What a beautiful day at the beach! Located at Little Talbot Island State Park in Jacksonville, Florida.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 14 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

Also written for Photos by Jez’s Water Water Everywhere.

SQUARES – Perched upon the Driftwood

Tweety the Love Bird was perched up on a piece of driftwood in our garden ready for his photoshoot near the azalea.

Tweety was in full photography mode while posing upon the driftwood sculpture that Frank had built in one of the flower gardens. Tweety was so photogenic and gave us many days of pleasure photography him.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 13 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

Also written for Photos by Jez’s Water Water Everywhere.

SQUARES – Up Above the World So High

“Like a bowling ball in the sky…Our moon is not a little star but it brightens up our lives with each full moon cycle. This was a little more than a 3/4 moon and was stationed perfectly over these palm trees. Yesterday was the sun and today is the moon. Both were taken a while ago.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 12 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

Also written for Photos by Jez’s Water Water Everywhere.

SQUARES – Uplifting

Gorgeous sunset over the water while we observed in on the shoreline at Fort Clinch State Park in Fernandina Beach, Florida.

Talk about lifting up your mood. As the sun went down, our moods went up! A beautiful sunset over a body of water always does the trick. This fabulous sunset created a euphoria to end a great day of birding at Fort Clinch State Park in Fernandina Beach, Florida. The Pelicans were late arriving to their roosting spot for the evening. In the background, it looks like something is going up in smoke.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 11 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

Also written for Photos by Jez’s Water Water Everywhere.

SQUARES – Upside Down

Red-bellied Woodpecker captured foraging for insects in a large oak tree at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge near Tallahassee, Florida.

Red-bellied Woodpeckers are so acrobatic they could be in the circus. As they forage around for insects in trees as seen in the top photo captured at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge near Tallahassee, Florida. They are quite adaptive to visiting your feeders as well. They love the peanuts and will do a “grab and go”. So often, we will watch them come, grab a peanut and fly off to stash it in a hiding place. They will do this back and forth regimen until they raid the whole feeder of the peanuts as seen in the photo below.

Red-bellied Woodpecker stealing all the peanuts in our feeder while hanging upside down.  He grabbed it and flew off to stash it away.  This went on for over 30 minutes.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 10 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

Song Lyric Sunday – “All The Gold In California” by Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers

This week Jim Adams has prompted us with choosing song titles starting with a “M” or a “A” for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday. This week I chose “All the Gold in California” by Larry Gatlin & the Gatlin Brothers.

Early Years

Later Years – 2018

Before you judge too hard on Larry Gatlin’s voice from when he was young until just a couple of years ago, you should know that he had cancer and underwent surgery to remove cysts from his vocal cords in June, 1991. In the second video, you may recognize members of the Oak Ridge Boys performing with him and his younger brothers, Steve and Rudy. The trio of Larry, Steve & Rudy made up Larry Gatlin & the Gatlin Brothers.

The Gatlin’s are from Texas. Larry was born in Seminole in Gaines County, Texas near the New Mexico border. His father was an oilfield worker and his family moved all over west Texas. He grew up listening to country and Southern gospel music. Larry, Steve and Rudy have been performing together since they were youngsters. They often sang in church with their sister, LaDonna.

“All the Gold in California was written by Larry Gatlin , released in August, 1979 and reached #1 on the US Hot Country Songs and #2 on the Canadian RPM Country tracks. Larry wrote this song while stuck in a traffic jam in Los Angeles. The premise of the song is that all the gold in the state of California is in a bank in the middle of Beverly Hills in someone else’s name. It further tells the listener that if you think you are going to California to strike it rich, you might be disappointed.

Larry Gatlin & the Gatlin Brothers performed “All The Gold in California” on January 18, 1985 for the nationally televised star studded 50th Presidential Inaugural Gala, a day before Ronald Reagan was inaugurated for his second term. Wiki states that it was January 19th and my memory won’t allow me to remember the exact date. The above video is almost 2 hours long. If you have time to watch it, it is worth it. It is when our democracy was making great strides in equality. It is filled with humor and wonderful performances.

Larry and his brothers will be performing at the Grand Ole Opry on January 22, January 30 and February 12, 2021. See other tour dates here. I’ve never seen them in concert and would love to check that off my bucket list. They are coming to Florida in December so maybe covid will be under control and I can attend that concert.


“All The Gold In California”

All the gold in California
Is in a bank in the middle of Beverly Hills
In somebody else's name
So if you're dreamin' about California
It don't matter at all where you've played before
California's a brand-new game
Tryin' to be a hero, winding up a zero
Can scar a man forever right down to your soul
Living on the spotlight can kill a man outright
'Cause everything that glitters is not gold
And all the gold in California
Is in a bank in the middle of Beverly Hills
In somebody else's name
So if you're dreamin' about California
It don't matter at all where you've played before
California's a brand-new game
All the gold in California
Is in a bank in the middle of Beverly Hills
In somebody else's name
So if you're dreamin' about California
It don't matter at all where you've played before
California's a brand-new game
A brand-new game
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Larry Gatlin
All the Gold In California lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group 

Sunday Stills – Year in REview – 2020

The feature image is how we spent our summer social distancing at Little Talbot State Park in Jacksonville, Florida.

This post is in response to TERRI WEBSTER SCHRANDT Sunday Stills challenge. The theme this week is Your 2020 #Retrospect.

January

What a challenging year 2020 was in many respects. I began my year with a birding blog on January 5, 2020 called “Today is for the Birds” with great excitement because I had just written my first guest blog with Jacksonville Business Connections through my job titled “Unlock the Bird Lover in You for 2020“. Little did I know that it wouldn’t last.

February

I was taking more time to write the “Living in the Moment” blogs from our wonderful vacation to Yellowstone National Park and Grand Tetons National Park that had taken us on a 12 day adventure in September, 2019. This image takes us to the Old Yellowstone Trail, the Road Less Traveled.

March

On March 17th, I was sent home from work to “work from home” indefinitely due to the COVID pandemic. That lasted all of two weeks when I was laid off with 28 other employees. I had been there for 11 1/2 years and had planned on retiring with the company in about 10 more years. Plans change!

March 31st was mine and Frank’s 3rd wedding anniversary. It also was the day that I went to the office and cleaned out my desk. What a task after being there all those years. Talk about bittersweet! It was a sad and happy day all at the same time. Here is a look back on the anniversary blog. For our wedding, we dressed in 50’s attire, got married by “the” Elvis in Vegas and had such a great time. Please click on the anniversary blog link above to see the video of the ceremony if you missed it.

April

April was when I first joined Becky’s squares. What a treat that was when I first began. It helped me get through the turmoil that I was feeling from losing my job. My 94 year old neighbor had passed away in February and this sunflower was growing in her front yard. It was like she was telling me to hold my head up and smile! That blog is here. A video shows the flower dancing and waving to me.

May

May found me in a bit of a panic. The pandemic wasn’t anymore under control in May than it was when we went into lockdown in March. We were not getting called back to work. There were no jobs to be found and frankly I was scared to death at the thought of going on a job interview or being around people period. I decided that I would start an Etsy shop. I had been a Graphic Artist for 22 years at this point and I could put those skills to good use. I was spending everyday writing a blog which was great mental therapy. Many of you got me through that rough time of indecision. Cee’s Photo Challenges were a huge highlight and inspired me to start thinking about creating a challenge of my own. Here is one on “Things that are Short” featuring piglets born at the Jacksonville County Fair in November, 2019. I’m so appreciative for all your support.

June

As things began to open back up in Florida and across the country, there was a glimmer of hope that we had beaten down covid. Of course that wasn’t the case. On our daily walk with Heaven, we walked passed St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church just a block from our house where they were holding church service. It wasn’t in the chapel but in the main hall were we go to vote because it is a large area where they could social distance. Not many there, but at least they were able to worship. I wrote this for Silent Sunday.

St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Jacksonville, Florida.
Side view of St. Andrews Episcopal Church.

June marked the first Bird Weekly Photo Challenge. Bird Weekly started on June 12, 2020 with the theme for that week being Song Birds. I featured the Carolina Wren as they are known as the “Mouth of the South”. They are loud and have a beautiful tweedle-tweedle-tweedle or a tea-kettle, tea-kettle, tea-kettle song. Only the male Carolina Wren sings.

I had really started ramping up my business plan and began working on product development and designs for my Etsy shop. I launched it at the end of June. One of my first items was a face mask decal. Then came along Shweta Suresh’s Saturday Six Word Story Prompt of “Leave”.

Protect others by wearing a mask during the pandemic
Be responsible and wear a mask!

July

July marks the anniversary of the passing of my mom and my dad. My mom passed away on July 9, 2014 and my dad passed away on July 12, 2015. While they divorced when I was 10, it was still very strange that their deaths were so close together 1 year apart. I dedicated blogs to each of them and for some reason, I really struggled last July.

August

In August, I was still blogging a lot and decided it was time to let all my fellow bloggers know what I was up to the past few months leading up to the end of summer. I announced the opening of my Etsy shop. It was met with great enthusiasm and many of you became customers. I want you to know it is appreciated! Our Eyes Open Designs was open for business. If you would like to visit my shop, here is the link. https://www.etsy.com/shop/OurEyesOpenDesigns

A few days after the launch of the Etsy shop, I received a phone call from my previous employer. He was not happy about what I was doing and threatened to send me a Cease and Desist for violating a non-compete claiming it was in the Employee Handbook. The legal jargon in the handbook was a Conflict of Interest clause and since I was no longer an employee and it didn’t appear they were going to call me back once Florida opened up, I wasn’t in violation of anything. They sent me a Cease and Desist wanting me to sign a “legal” form stating I wouldn’t compete in my field of knowledge in the entire United States and if I didn’t sign it, they would shut down my shop. Guess what? I didn’t sign it and it went nowhere! I don’t take kindly to being bullied so I put everything in writing that was legally sound. I already had an attorney open a case file for me in case it did.

September

In September, the Tampa Bay Rays found themselves in the Major League Baseball (MLB) playoffs for the first time since 2010. Being a Rays fan since their inception in 1998 (known as the Tampa Bay Devil Rays), it was very exciting. The Rays defeated the Toronto Blue Jays in the American League Wild Card Series.

I reposted Jen Goldie’s first blog that she so graciously put together for our division rivalry. Both teams played great, but the Rays came up on top, winning the American League Wild Card Series in 2 games. We had fun “trash talking” back and forth and then she rooted on the Rays the rest of the way. I would have done the same for her. Sorry Jen Goldie about your Jays.

October

The Rays then took on the New York Yankees which was a best 3 out of 5 game series. It went to game 5 with the Rays beating the Yankees in a nail-biter, 2-1 for the title of American League Division Series (ALDS) Champions.

Next came the American League Championship Series (ALCS) where the Rays took on the Houston Astros in a 7 game series. It went to 7 games with Charlie Morton on the mound. Tampa Bay rose to the top with a 4-2 win moving on to the World Series for the second time in franchise history winning the American League pennant. The Rays had only been to the World Series one other time in 2008.

The World Series stage was set when the Los Angeles Dodgers won the National League pennant. Unfortunately, the Tampa Bay Rays came up short losing in Game 6, crowning the Los Angeles Dodgers as World Series Champions.

Tampa Bay rookie, Randy Arozarena broke the Rookie record for the most homeruns in the post-season.


Halloween is my favorite holiday and it was just strange this year. I did not dress up as anything or anyone. We chose to not hand out goodies for any possible “trick or treaters” and it started raining shortly after it got dark. It was a quiet night with our feet up, popcorn and movie night. I did post on Becky’s squares “The Spooky Kind” showing how much we decorate and get into character.

November

Again, there it was going to be a quite Thanksgiving. My kids and grandkids are in Tampa and we were not going to make any plans to see them. My daughter, Kaela who lives here in Jacksonville was preparing to move. Everything happened the week of Thanksgiving and they actually starting moving two days before Thanksgiving. We made a conservative Thanksgiving meal and took a goodie bag over to Kaela and her boyfriend, Danny. They had packed everything up and were fixing and cleaning the house they were moving out of so they appreciated the food.

For the November, 15th Sunday Stills, Terry was looking for the color Auburn. The photo above is of me, Andy Hillstrand from the Time Bandit and my daughter, Kaela. A lot of Auburn in the photo and shows me with Auburn hair before it got so gray. Even though the Hillstrand brothers are no longer on Deadliest Catch, I’m still a big fan of the show.

My hair was still auburn. Now it is lighter brown with gray. My daughter’s hair is still this beautiful color that highlights shades of auburn.

December

I found myself up to my eyeballs in orders. I didn’t anticipate the holiday rush that happened. I found myself working 12-14 hours days just to keep up with customer service and production. My big seller was a Custom Dog Bone Ornament. I sold over 240 units from Black Friday until after Christmas. Deborah over at Circadianreflections Blog was one of the first to purchase this very cool product for her beloved doggie that passed away. Several customers asked to put the birth year and death year on the bone which I was happy to oblige at no extra charge.


Blogging took a backseat in December as I filled orders and tried to get ready for Christmas myself and continue to keep up with my orders. I did manage to keep up with Bird Weekly with the last one for 2020 ending on 12/18 with birds in or near the water or snow.

American Oystercatcher at Fort Desoto on our last trip to Tampa on January 2, 2020.

Much Needed Time Off

On the morning of Christmas Eve, I was doing my hair when the spring in my 17 year old curling iron snapped, going down my back and burning me in two places. Okay, at least my hair was pretty much finished. I was anxiously awaiting for my BFF Morgan and her hubby Dave to get here. We ate lunch and then Morgan & I headed to purchase a new curling iron. No way I was going to go the next several days without it. I have serious bed head these days. My old iron was a Hot Tools and cost me $120. I dreaded getting a new one. I took mine with me so that I got the correct barrel size. Low and behold, the same exact curling iron was only $45. YAY!

Me and Morgan with her new haircut and bum shoulder.

That evening, Morgan wanted a haircut. I’m not a pro and don’t have a license but I can do a pretty good job. I had cut her hair in September when they were here for a visit. She broke her shoulder ball on her left side in a bicycle accident just a week prior to Christmas so she was a little gimpy. After I cut her hair, she showered and Dave was blow drying her hair with my 17 year old Hot Tools blow dryer when it burned up. Yep, both the same day! I paid $150 for the blow dryer new in 2005. I lucked out again and found a comparable one, same brand for $35 the day after Christmas. No complaints because I got my money’s worth out of both devices.

The photo above was Christmas morning. We both walked out of our bedrooms and giggled that we both had our Penguin Christmas sweaters on. It was NOT planned and I had never seen her sweater before and she hadn’t ever seen mine. It is usually too hot in Florida, even at Christmastime to wear a warm sweater.

Last Blog Post 2020

What a year 2020 turned out to be. I was ready to see it come to an end! My last blog post ended similar to how it started. The announcement of the Bird Weekly Challenge List was expanded. Now I’m looking towards the future of what 2021 has in store and so far it is starting off great! We have already seen 109 species of birds since January 1st.

Thank to everyone for a fun ride despite the obstacles. Pray for everyone who lost their lives to covid and those left behind. Stay happy, healthy and safe!

SQUARES – Petrified Tree

Petrified Tree that is tens of millions years old still standing in Yellowstone National Park.

Looking UP at the famous Petrified Tree at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. This tree was once a large redwood tree among a forest of trees before large volcanic eruptions destroyed the habitat. Read more about this famous tree still standing after millions of years at Your Yellowstone Vacation. A fence had to be placed around it so people couldn’t just walk up to it and vandalize it. Sometimes we have to keep the human element out to keep history intact.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 9 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

SQUARES – CloseUP

Closeup of a dragonfly at Okefenokee Wildlife Refuge in Folkston, Georgia.

CloseUP of a dragonfly at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Folkston, Georgia. It just kept getting closer and landing in front of me. Guess it wanted its photo taken.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 8 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

Bird Weekly – Photo Challenge – Birds Starting with a “C”

Carolina Wren with an insect in its beak to feed 3 hungry chicks.

Welcome to Week #30 of the Bird Weekly Photo Challenge. Week #30 challenge is Birds starting with a “C”. As long as one of the words in the title starts with a “C” it is good to go. Like Double-crested Cormorant which could also work for the “D” challenge in a few weeks.

The feature image is a Carolina Wren. There was a nest in this hanging basket. The female laid 4 eggs. Three hatched and all three chicks thrived and fledged. We watched the male and female catch insects and gorge on mealworms provided by us to raise those babies that fledged about 3 weeks after they hatched. This was in April, 2020 when I had just lost my job due to the pandemic and brought brightness to my days and life.

Before we plan our birding trips, we scour the many lists on Ebird.org to see what has been seen and logged in recent days. If you don’t use Ebird and want to get out there and find them, I suggest using this site or download the app to your phone. The data you submit goes directly to CornellLab of Ornithology. Birds are logged by birders and scientist all over the world.

Steps to a Great Day of Birding

  • Log on to Ebird.org site. Free to create an account.
  • Click on the Explore tab at the top and then click on Explore Hotspots.
  • Find our favorite hotspots within a few hours drive and look over the lists.
  • Create an agenda on where we are going. Usually verbally, nothing fancy or written down. We do this a day or two before we want to go.
  • Pack a lunch, snacks and several thermoses of water as there are almost no places to eat where we go. Some are driving trails and some are hiking trails. Many of the them are a little of both.
  • Take a notepad & pen to write down the birds as we see them. Old school, however the new Ebird app has a feature that you can start a list, add your birds as you see them in a specific area and it will record the whole time you are in that area. When you are finished birding in an area, you can then complete the number of each species, complete the data and finish recording until you get to the next spot. It records the time you start and finish so you don’t have to do that manually. I’ve used it once and loved it, but when I’m out there, it is pretty easy for me to write them down. For me, it’s a mental exercise.

Two and half hour (one way) Trip

This week, Frank & I have had a big week. We took two birding day trips. Monday, we went to Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge. In a 9 hour day, we saw 65 species of birds. On every trip, we have at least one target bird of the day, but on this day, we had three. The Sora, Cinnamon Teal and Florida Scrub-Jay. We saw all our target birds and then some. At the end of the day, January 4th, we had logged 85 species since the beginning of 2021.

Three hour (one way) Trip

Then on Wednesday, we got up at dark-thirty and drove to St. Marks Wildlife Refuge with the American Flamingo and Canvasback as our target birds. Unlikely that we would see the flamingo as there was a lot of water in the wetlands. We were right. We hiked miles looking for that bird, but came up empty. We did, however, see over 10,000 waterfowl in one pond. It was like nothing we have ever seen before. We did get the Canvasback. At the end of an 9 hour day, I logged birds on the trip home and we saw 73 species. We have 109 species for the year and it is only January 8th.

The true magic of this week was that I got two target birds starting with a “C” for this weeks challenge. That never happens. 2021 is starting off pretty darn good. The bird photos above are just a small section I could get at one time. I didn’t bring my other lens to get the whole pond. There must have been over 1000 Redheads.


Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinals are probably the easiest bird to identify. They are popular as live birds, but they adorn many items and are a true symbol of the holidays. I have several cardinal ornaments decorating my Christmas Tree. The quilt on my bed is embroidered with Cardinals. This photo was taken in our backyard on the fountain that Frank built out of stone and driftwood that he collected in Washington State and granite that was left over from our kitchen remodel. He repurposes many things to create new things.

“Grabbing a bite to eat for my photoshoot, but Mr. Red-bellied had to get himself in there. I guess I can share the spotlight”.


Chipping Sparrow

The Chipping Sparrow makes its home all over North America. To attract them to your feeder, I would suggest black oil sunflower seeds. They will eat most birdseed, but the black oil sunflower seed is their favorite.


Common Gallinule

The Common Gallinule is also known as the Common Moorhen. These birds swim like a duck but have the feet like a chicken that allows them to walk like rails on top of floating vegetation seen here. They are easily spotted with the red shield over their bill and the white stripe going down their side.


Double-crested Cormorant

These Cormorants were preparing to roost for the night as we were leaving St. Marks on Wednesday evening. So many of them were flying in and knocking others off branches. “How Rude!” Like the Anhinga from the last challenge, the Cormorants have to perch in the sun, wings spread out to dry because they have less preen oil than other birds which makes their wings not waterproof.


Cattle Egret

The Cattle Egret is a true World Traveller. They can be found in agricultural areas near wetlands. They are often in open fields and you might get a photo op of one perched up on top of a cow or horse. They follow behind farm equipment and large animals that stir up invertebrates and will head towards smoke to catch fleeing insects as they evacuate the fire.


Yellow-crowned Night Heron

This Yellow-crowned Night Heron is a juvenile that we spotted at Lettuce Lake Park in Tampa, Florida last January. This is the perfect habitat for them as they eat crabs and crayfish. They catch their food with a lunge and will shake it apart or swallow it whole.


Cinnamon Teal

Rare Bird Alert! The last time we saw a Cinnamon Teal was when we went to Henderson Birding Preserve outside of Las Vegas, NV. This duck breeds in the Western part of the United States and rarely is seen east of Texas. This guy migrated in with the Blue-winged Teals and was spotted at Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge near the second blind of #3 on Monday. A separate breeding population of Cinnamon Teals can be found in South America.


Canvasback

Imagine trying to spot one Canvasback in the midst of 1000 Redheads surrounding him and separate him from the hundreds of American Wigeons and Blue-winged Teals. That is the scenario that played out on Wednesday at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge. This was our target bird for the day and he was spotted amongst the Redheads (seen behind the Canvasback). Easiest way to distinguish these two red headed ducks is the Canvasback has a longer bill and the white plumage on his back. To see them together during migration makes sense. The female Canvasback sometimes lays eggs in another Canvasback nest and Redheads and Ruddy Ducks sometimes lay their eggs in a Canvasback nest.

The Canvasback species name is valisineria meaning wild celery. The winter buds and stems are their preferred food during non-breeding periods.


American Coot

Often seen by the thousands during migration, the American Coot is similar to the Common Gallinule as it swims and floats like a duck but has those long toes like a chicken to climb around on marshy vegetation. They are a close relative to the Sandhill Crane if you can believe that. On Monday, we saw over 4000 on an 11 mile stretch of the Black Point Drive at Merritt Island Wildlife Preserve.


Common Yellowthroat

Male Common Yellowthroat flitting around the brush.
Common Yellowthroat – Male

Found all over North America, the Common Yellowthroat is among the numerous warblers in their habitat. The male Common Yellowthroat is like seeing the Lone Ranger with its broad black mask. They are very vocal birds with their witchety-witchety-witchety songs.


Canada Goose

The Canada Goose is one of the birds that has done a fine job of expanding its territory. I mentioned a few weeks ago how they have become invasive in many areas. I guess they found that retirement in Florida was a really great idea!


Common Merganser

This Common Merganser with 5 other females swam alongside our Inflatable kayak that we loaded on a plane for our trip to Yellowstone and Grand Tetons. We were paddling String Lake in Grand Teton National Park when they flew in and landed near our boat. Couldn’t believe I was bobbing in the water and got this shot clearly. This is a bird that we don’t see in the southeastern part of the United States.

Common Raven

The Common Raven is found mainly on the west coast of the US, Mexico and Canada. It would not be unusual for it to be seen in some of the northern states from North Carolina. We had to go to Vegas to get our first sighting. This guy was perched up in a tree at the Desert National Wildlife Refuge just north of the Las Vegas strip.

Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Cranes seen near Viera Wetlands. Viera, Florida is just south of Cape Canaveral and one of several favorite birding spots in that area.


Upcoming challenges can be found on my Bird Weekly Challenge Page.

Next time…Week #31 – Butts in the air. Please try to identify what the bird is that has its butt feather smiling at you.

Bird Weekly Round-Up – Week #29

Week #29 challenge was Birds with a Long Wing Span.

Disclaimer: If anyone has an issue with me using their photos in the round ups, please kindly let me know. I haven’t had anyone say anything, but I don’t want you to think I’m using your photographs for personal gain. I’m here to show what great work you are doing with your photography by showing you off in these posts.


Hope everyone had a wonderful New Years! To say that I was ready for 2020 to be over and in the books is an understatement. We had a quiet day after staying up late babying Heaven because of the fireworks. For those who have just joined us and may not know me, Heaven is our 14 year old Bichon that just doesn’t do well with fireworks and thunderstorms. The fireworks finally stopped at about 1:30am. She stayed close to us under a blanket on the couch for safety. Now….back to the birds!

It is truly amazing to watch birds fly high or low in the sky. The aerial show they put on for us humans is an absolute necessity for their survival. This week we showcased birds with long wingspans. The bird with the largest wingspan living in the world is the Wandering Albatross found in the Southern Ocean with a wingspan of 12 feet (3.7 meters). In 2010, researchers found and gave a name to a bird much larger. It is named Pelagornis chilensis which lived 5 million to 10 million years ago and had a wingspan of at least 17 feet (5.1 meters). This new species that lived long ago was based on an intact skeleton. An article from the New York Times is here if you would like to read it.

Really a wonderful gallery of birds with long wingspans this week. Just wanted to make mention that Lisa’s Vulture looks like a magician performing a “ta da” moment!


Welcome to the newcomers, Karen & Becky.

Roseate Spoonbill flying in preparing to roost for the night along the Hillsborough River at Lettuce Lake Park in Tampa, Florida.
My Roseate Spoonbill

I encourage you to visit these blogs if you haven’t already and see what amazing things they have going on. If I missed your post or there was a problem with a pingback, please let me know and I will be glad to add you to the list. Remember to pingback from my post of that week and not my page. Liking my page is encouraged!


Next up: Week #30: Birds with beginning with “C” At least one word in the name has to begin with a “C”. For example, Double-breasted Cormorant or Cinnamon Teal.

VISIT MY BIRD WEEKLY PAGE FOR A FULL LIST OF UPCOMING CHALLENGES AND RULES!

I look forward to seeing your creations this week!

SQUARES – What Goes Up, Must Come Down

On May 14, 2010, Space Shuttle Atlantis made is final flight. It was a bittersweet end to this shuttle’s excellent record to explore space with humans aboard. This was the only shuttle I watched go up in person after spending years watching them on television. The moment had me in tears as we witnessed history from Titusville, Florida as Atlantis took off from Cape Canaveral “The Cape” and rise up into the abyss.

Here is Atlantis in her final resting place at the entrance to Kennedy Space Center.

Last July, we took a little ride to the entrance of Kennedy Space Center about 30 minutes before closing time. The guard was nice enough to let us drive in and take some photos. My sister & her family were here from Texas and we told the guard we were not here to visit the entire center and explained that they we would like to take some photos of Atlantis. For me, it was another moment that reminded me of the last flight and how special it was.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 7 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

SQUARES – Up and Over

Boardwalk at the #2 parking area at Canaveral National Seashore near Cape Canaveral Space Center.

At the very end of our day at Merritt Island, we decided to head over to the Canaveral National Seashore for a last look for birds. We only had 50 minutes before closing time and we found more birds and a beautiful sunset. We stopped at the 2nd parking area along the beach side and climbed up to the top of the boardwalk to see the Atlantic Ocean. I captured that sunset on the uphill climb as we departed the beach area.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 6 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

SQUARES – Skydivers

Tandem skydivers coming down after going up and being dropped off in a plane.  Perfect blue skies set the background.

Yesterday, on our way to Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge in Titusville, Florida, we stopped at the grocery store to pick up some fresh bread. I walked out of the store and looked UP and saw these tandem skydivers floating down with a pink & purple parachute just above us. What a perfect opportunity for a photo for January UP squares. I ran to the car and grabbed my camera and got a few shots off. Our birding adventure afterwards was the best day we’ve ever had! More to come on that.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 5 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

SQUARES – Always Looking Up

Frank & me at our wedding in Las Vegas, Nevada on March 31, 2017.

At 5′ 1″ tall, I have to look up at everyone except kids and even some of them I have to look up to once they grow passed my height. Frank is 5′ 7″ so I don’t have to look too high up. This was our wedding almost 4 years ago in Las Vegas, Nevada. It was fun and non-pretentious. Getting married by an Elvis impersonator was perfect for us!

Frank and me with our Elvis impersonator during our wedding ceremony in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Our Elvis impersonator showed us a good time at our very short wedding ceremony!

Day 4 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

SQUARES – Looking Down, not Up

Photo of the boardwalk and swamp land in Okefenokee Wildlife Refuge in Folkston, Georgia. Taken from the top of the tower that ends a 3/4 mile hike.

We had to climb UP the tower at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Folkston, Georgia to be able to look down at the swampy area in which the 3/4 mile Chesser Island boardwalk takes us. The tower is 90 feet and takes you to the end of the trail providing you with the best nature walk and unique perspective to the ecosystem up close and personal.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 3 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

Song Lyric Sunday – “Polk Salad Annie”

This week Jim Adams has prompted us with choosing song titles starting with a “P” or a “G” for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday. This week I chose “Polk Salad Annie”.

“Polk Salad Annie was written & performed by Tony Joe White aka Swamp Fox in 1968. White grew up listening to country music and Cajun music of Louisiana. After hearing Bobbie Gentry’s “Ode to Billie Joe”, White wrote what he knew and he knew about pokeweed. The song was recorded in Muscle Shoals, Alabama and was his first single. The song refers to a poor Southern girl and her preparation of an unfamiliar dish called Poke Sallet. In the song, Annie knows how to properly cook the plant.

White was born in Oak Grove, Louisiana in 1943. Oak Grove is just west of the Mississippi River where pokeweed or “poke” grows wild and where the alligators live in moss-covered swamps. His folks would make poke sallet which is said to taste like spinach. “Sallet” is an old English word meaning “cooked greens”, not to be mistaken for “salad”. The record companies labeled the song “salad” but the pokeweed eaten raw can be deadly. The leaves must be boiled in water three times to cook out their toxins.

For White, the single peaked at #8 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart and #10 on the RPM Magazine Hot Singles chart in Canada.


In 1970, Elvis Presley made “Polk Salad Annie” a main staple to his live stage performances for the next 7 years. He recorded it and it became the only version of “Polk Salad Annie” to chart in the UK and Ireland. The song was issued on 6 of Elvis’ albums.


“Polk Salad Annie” was on the original motion picture soundtrack of the 2019 film Ford v Ferrari starring Matt Damon and Christian Bale. A movie based on the true story of Henry Ford II, Carroll Shelby and Ken Miles to build a racecar in 90 days that would compete and beat Ferrari at 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1966. There was no video available of the song being played during the scene so I give you a trailer from the movie with the remix of “Polk Salad Annie” by James Burton.

Burton’s recording of “Polk Salad Annie” was recorded in March, 1971 at A&M Records and put on his album “The Guitar Sounds of James Burton”. It was produced by Elvis’ producer, Felton Jarvis. The album was produced after Elvis became ill with eye issues to which Elvis had to cancel his own sessions with Burton on guitar. To fill the empty studio space, Burton recorded his album that features “Polk Salad Annie”. In the soundtrack remix for Ford v Ferrari, titled Le Mans ’66 in the UK and other overseas territories, you can hear Felton Jarvis’ count-in that precedes the recording.

Ford v Ferrari is rated PG-13.


“”Polk Salad Annie”

If some of ya'll never been down south too much
I'm gonna tell you a little bit about this
So that you'll understand what I'm talkin' about
Down there we have a plant that grows out in the woods
And in the fields looks somethin' like a turnip green
And everybody calls it polk salad, polk salad
Used to know a girl lived down there
And she'd go out in the evenings and pick her a mess of it
Carry it home and cook it for supper
'Cause thats about all they had to eat, but they did all right
Down in Louisiana, where the alligators grow so mean
There lived a girl, that I swear to the world
Made the alligators look tame
Polk salad Annie, polk salad Annie
Everybody said it was a shame
Cause her momma was a workin' on the chain gang
(A mean vicious woman)
Everyday ?for supper time, she'd go down by the truck patch
And pick her a mess of polk salad, and carry it home in a tow sack
Polk salad Annie, the gators got your granny
Everybody says it was a shame
Cause her momma was a workin' on the chain gang
(A wretched, spiteful, straight-razor totin' woman
Lord have Mercy, pick a mess of it)
Her daddy was lazy and no count, claimed he had a bad back
All her brothers were fit for was stealin' watermelons
Out of my truck patch
Polk salad Annie, the gators got your granny
Everybody said it was a shame
Cause her momma was a workin' on the chain gang
(Sock a little polk salad to me, you know I need me a mess of it)
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Tony White / Tony Joe White
Polk Salad Annie lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Pokeweed Bush in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. It grows all over the United States.

SQUARES – Angel From Up Above

Our angel garnered in navy blue and gold looks upon us every Christmas season.  She is over 30 years old.

Our angel that floats from up above in our living room. She has looked upon our family during the Christmas season every holiday for over 30 years. Thought she was the perfect square for day 2. She brings peace to our surroundings as we celebrate the birth of Jesus.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 2 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

Last Photo – Dec. 2020

All about the birds…all the time!

Semipalmated Plover located at Huguenot Park in Jacksonville, Florida on the last day of 2020.
Semipalmated Plover

The last photo from my Sony A6300 on 12-31-2020 while birding at Huguenot Park in Jacksonville, Florida was the Semipalmated Plover. It was the only plover on the beach from over a 1000 shorebirds. Not sure how I spotted it. Maybe because it was by itself and was smaller than the others.


Looking through the windshield of my car at the bird poop from the American Robins that were held up in my trees.  They migrated a early.
Bird Poop

American Robins have migrated a bit early and left me a present on my windshield. There were hundreds of them in the trees in my backyard. I found the poop in my line of site when I got into my car. Wasn’t that nice of them? This was 12-30-2020. Last pic on my IPhone.

In response to Brian at bushboys world “Last Photo” Photo Challenge – December 2020.

SQUARES – Up in a Tree

Roseate Spoonbills preparing to roost for the night in some trees along the Hillsborough River at Lettuce Lake Park in Tampa, Florida.

These Roseate Spoonbills were preparing to roost in the trees that line the Hillsborough River at Lettuce Lake Park in Tampa, Florida. This photo was taken several years ago with my old Nikon. My Bird Weekly Challenge for this week restarts today after taking last week off for Christmas. The theme this week is birds with Long Wingspans where you will see the Spoonbill and other birds. Take a look here if you would like to see it or join us.

So happy to be back for squares in 2021!

Day 1 – Squares – “UP”

Click the panel below to visit Becky’s site and the January Squares Photo Challenge:

Bird Weekly – Photo Challenge – Birds with Long Wingspans

Welcome to Week #29 of the Bird Weekly Photo Challenge. Week #29 challenge is Birds with Long Wingspans.

The feature image is a Red-shouldered Hawk. This bird of prey is a large, broad-winged hawk that is approximately 17 inches (48-61 cm) with a wingspan of 37-43.7 inches (94-111 cm).

Happy 2021 everyone! Our first Bird Weekly Photo Challenge for the new year! We had some great birding in 2020 despite the challenges the world is facing with the pandemic, economy and job loss. If you get a chance to thank a front line worker, please do so because they keep our lives at a somewhat “normal” level. I always thank the people checking me out at the grocery store and the one who cleans the shopping cart after every human has touched it. They continue to keep us safe, take care of those who have fallen ill and do their jobs despite the dangers they face so that we can have the freedom to get outside in nature to do what we love.

This week, we explore birds with long wingspans. I missed everyone last week but I hope you had a wonderful holiday!


Roseate Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbill flying towards a roosting tree over the Hillsborough River in Tampa, Florida.

The Roseate Spoonbill is a 32 inches (81 cm) bird that can reach a height of up to 2.5 feet (80 cm) with a wingspan that can stretch 1.5 times as wide, reaching up to 4 feet (120 cm).


Wood Stork

The Wood Stork is a large bird that is 33-44 inches (85-115 cm) bird with a wingspan reaching 59-60 inches (150-175 cm).

Wood Stork drying his wings in the sun at Sweetwater Preserve in Gainesville, Florida.

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk soaring high above looking for prey.

The Red-tailed hawk is distinguished by its red tail and is 18-26 inches (45-56 cm) with a wingspan of 3.4-4.8 feet (114-133 cm). It is the most common hawk in North America. They fly high above open fields, slowly turning their broad rounded wings to position themselves to go in after their prey. The Red-tailed Hawk is the bird that swooped down and knocked our Love Bird, Tweety off his perch, pinned him to the ground and flew off with him in his talons. Gruesome account, but accurate.


Turkey Vulture

The Turkey Vulture is a 25-32 inch (64-81 cm) bird with a 6 foot (170-178 cm) wingspan. They are the clean up crew who are opportunist. They do not kill their prey, they rather wait for something to be killed or die. They prefer fresh meat that is 12-24 hours old.

A family of Turkey Vultures hanging out at Sweetwater Preserve in Gainesville, Florida.

A family of Turkey Vultures hanging out at the Sweetwater Preserve in Gainesville, Florida. The two small black ones on the left are juveniles.


Osprey

Osprey flying in with building material for a nest.

The Osprey is a large bird of prey that is 21-23 inches (53-58 cm) and has a wingspan of 5 feet (1.5 meters) Both the male and female build the nest, but the male usually arrives first to find the site before the female arrives. It is believed they are mostly monogamous and often mate for life.


Anhinga

Anhinga perched on the railing of the boardwalk drying his wings at Sweetwater Preserve in Gainesville, Florida.

The Anhinga is 35 inches (89 cm) with a wingspan that reaches 3.7 feet (1.14 meters). They are fish eaters and dive like ducks with their webbed feet. Once finished in the water, they have to dry their wings by spreading them out as they don’t have a natural repellent on their feathers like many birds.


Great Egret

Great Egret fishing.

An adult Great Egret can reach a length of 2.6-3.4 feet (80-104 cm) with a wingspan of 52-67 inches (131-170 cm). This bird is the symbol of the National Audubon Society, one of the oldest environmental organizations in North America. Audubon was founded to protect birds from being killed for their feathers when they were almost extinct in the nineteenth century.


Cattle Egret

Cattle Egret stalking its prey at Sweetwater Preserve in Gainesville, Florida.

The Cattle Egret is a small white heron at 18.1-22.1 inches (46-55 cm) in length with a wingspan of about 3 feet (88-96 cm). This bird was originally from Africa but found its way to North America in 1953.


Laughing Gull

Laughing Gull taking off from a pylon at the Reddie Point dock in Jacksonville, Florida.

While the Laughing Gull is not the largest of the gulls, it is still 15-18 inches in length (39-46 cm) with a wingspan of 36-47 inches (92-120 cm).


Brown Pelican

Brown Pelican soaring just above the water at Fort Clinch State Park in Fernandina, Florida.

The Brown Pelican is a 54 inch (100-137 cm) long bird with a 6.5-7 foot (200 cm) wingspan. Just before this pelican dive bombs from up above, it tucks its wings a bit for a more aerodynamic plunge to secure it’s fish as it hits the water.


Great Blue Heron

Little Blue Heron at Fort Desoto Park near St. Petersburg, Florida.

The Great Blue Heron is a 38-54 inch (97-137 cm) bird with an impressive wingspan of 65-79 inches (167-201 cm). With it’s large wingspan, it can soar up to 20-30 miles per hour (32-48 kph). Once on the ground, they are slow movers and patient feeders. They slowly stalk their prey of fish and other aquatic prey. They have been known to stab at and eat snakes as well.


Snail Kite

Snail Kite soaring and searching for snails in the marsh at La Chua Trail in Gainesville, Florida.

The Snail Kite is a medium-sized raptor measuring 14-19 inches (36-48 cm). It’s wingspan is 39-47 inches (99-120 cm). They forage, like this one, in marshy areas and open shallow waters in search of snails. They nest in wetlands of Southern Florida, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. We counted 4 of them on our birding trip to La Chua Trail in Gainesville, Florida on December 30, 2020.


Upcoming challenges can be found on my Bird Weekly Challenge Page.

Next time…Week #30 – Birds beginning with “C” such as Common Loon or Northern Cardinal. As long as one of the words begin with a “C”.

Bird Weekly Challenge List

I have updated the Bird Weekly Challenge Page for upcoming challenges through Week #40. If you are a planner, you can check it out by clicking on the image below to visit the page. For me, it helps me think about what birds I may want to go looking for and where to go looking for them on my adventures. Hope it helps you find the birds you are looking for to meet the challenges.

Remember…don’t link your post to this page, but create a pingback from my weekly blog post. Instructions on how to create a pingback are at the bottom of this post and on the Bird Weekly Page.

Photo of Laughing Gull at Little Talbot Island State Park for my Bird Weekly Photo Challenge.

I look forward to seeing everyone back this week on Friday, January 1, 2021 for Birds with Long Wingspans. Hope everyone had a wonderful Christmas! We went birding on Sunday for the first time in weeks to count birds for the Christmas Bird Count (CBC) for the Audubon Society. It was good to get out. We have had 15-20 species in our yard everyday for the past month and it has kept me sane on my breaks from my shop.

PINGBACKS

Create a pingback by copying my URL from MY POST for that week’s challenge and link it inside your post. It will be different each week. You can visit my post by clicking on it from my Bird Weekly page if it has turned green or by visiting my blog post from my blog feed once I have submitted it.

TO LINK

  1. Copy my URL from my post.
  2. Create a paragraph block. Type in the text you want.
  3. Highlight the text.
  4. Click the link or hit Ctrl K.
  5. Paste my URL in the (search or type URL) bar.
  6. Click the Open in New Tab.

Water Water Everywhere #57 – Geese at the Cemetery

Photos by Jez is the new host of WWE that is a weekly challenge posted on Monday.

Yesterday, December 27, 2020, Frank and I went out birding for the Christmas Bird Count (CBC) for the Audubon Society. We were given a parameter near our house to go see what species were around our area. Most of the song birds were in our yard as we have a lot of good food, but we found the waterfowl down at the Arlington Park Cemetery just about 1/4 mile from our house. Our birds were logged onto Ebird.org per the usual. The Canada Goose has become a permanent resident in Florida. There were 49 of them in the cemetery which is where Frank’s parents are spending their eternity. We stopped by to say hi and went about counting birds.

Bird Weekly Round-Up – Week #28

Week #28 challenge was Birds near or in the water or snow.

Disclaimer: If anyone has an issue with me using their photos in the round ups, please kindly let me know. I haven’t had anyone say anything, but I don’t want you to think I’m using your photographs for personal gain. I’m here to show what great work you are doing with your photography by showing you off in these posts.


With 71 percent of the Earth’s surface being water, I figured this bird weekly challenge would appeal to almost everyone. Like humans, birds need water to survive. Fresh water for drinking and the critters who live there that provide food for our feathered friends. Salt water and brackish water fill our oceans and rivers with an ecosystem that we must take care of and keep the pollution out to keep our birds from becoming endangered. For those who have snow, eventually that snow melt in the springtime will fill your rivers and lakes as life comes back from hibernation.

Reminder, there is no Bird Weekly today. I’m taking Christmas off for the rest of the day. We will be back next Friday on January 1st with Birds with long wingspans. We are going birding next week so I’m excited to captures some new birds. It’s been about 2 months since I’ve really been hiking and birding.

Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Holidays to you and your family! I raise my glass to you all for a much better 2021!


Welcome to the newcomers, Catherine, Tish and Robert.

V.J.’s Chickadee
Aletta’s Flamingos

I encourage you to visit these blogs if you haven’t already and see what amazing things they have going on. If I missed your post or there was a problem with a pingback, please let me know and I will be glad to add you to the list. Remember to pingback from my post of that week and not my page. Liking my page is encouraged!


Next up: Week #29: Birds with laong wingspans (January 1, 2021).

VISIT MY BIRD WEEKLY PAGE FOR A FULL LIST OF UPCOMING CHALLENGES AND RULES!

I look forward to seeing your creations this week!

Water Water Everywhere #56 – heron vs. gator

Tricolored Heron getting a little close to a large gator.

Photos by Jez is the new host of WWE that is a weekly challenge posted on Monday.

Tricolored Heron pushing his luck with the big ole' gator.  In Florida, where there's water, there is always a chance an alligator is somewhere to be found.

Tricolored Heron pushing his luck with the big ole’ gator. In Florida, where there’s water, there is always a chance an alligator is somewhere to be found.

Bird Weekly – Photo Challenge – Birds in or Near the Water or Snow

Welcome to Week #28 of the Bird Weekly Photo Challenge. Week #28 challenge is Birds in or near the water or snow.

This is the last Bird Weekly Challenge of 2020. Can you believe it? Good riddance 2020! Week #29 will be on January 1, 2021. Please enjoy your holidays next week. I will do a round up for this challenge on Christmas Day so watch for that.

Hoping this challenge lends itself to everyone. If you are anywhere near a creek, river, pond, lake or ocean, you should have a bird to post this week. I’m fortunate because I live 23 miles from the Atlantic Ocean and only 5 minutes from the St. Johns River which runs northward or in my mind, uphill. The St. Johns River, located in Florida is a total of 310 miles long (500 km). At its widest point, it is 3 miles wide (5km). It is separated into three major basins and has two associated watersheds for Lake George and the Ocklawaha River. It is under major restoration due to pollution caused by a growing population of people. We spend a lot of time birding along this stretch of water, not just in Jacksonville, but throughout the state.

The feature image is an American Oystercatcher that I captured on January 2, 2020 at Fort Desoto Park in Tierra Verde, Florida near St. Petersburg. It was our last trip to Tampa Bay after Covid changed our lives. I haven’t been down there to see my kids or grandkids in almost a year.

Roseate Spoonbill

The Roseate Spoonbill in this photo was seen in the swampy area of Lettuce Lake Park in Tampa, Florida along the Hillsborough River. They are short distance migratory birds and are mostly seen in coastal areas. They will travel inland in parts of the U.S., South America and the Caribbean.


Double-crested Cormorant

Double-crested Cormorant hiding behind some trees, hanging out with some ducks.

Hanging with the Ducks taking the term literally. Ducking behind these trees…I can still see you!


Willet

Willet feeding at Little Talbot Island State Park.

This Willet was feeding in the surf at Little Talbot Island State Park this past summer on a very warm day with high southeast winds causing some great wave action and a rough rip current. The Willet managed quite well in the tough circumstances. He was managing just fine.


Osprey

Osprey with a fish in its talons at Little Talbot Island State Park.

Different day on Little Talbot Island State Park when we watched this Osprey pluck this fish from 6 inches of water. The scene went on for about 20 minutes while he caught it, dropped it on the sand, circled back, played with it a while and then finally took off when the fish was secured.


Anhinga

Anhinga with a large fish. He beat it on the dock for about 30 minutes.

Talk about a fish catcher! This Anhinga caught this fish and spent about 30 minutes beating it on the dock. It is amazing how they can swallow a fish that size completely in tact and it go down that skinny little neck. This was taken on the St. Johns River.


Cinnamon Teal

Cinnamon Teal at Henderson Birding Preserve in Henderson, Nevada not far from the Las Vegas strip.

While visiting Las Vegas a few years ago, we went birding at the Henderson Birding Preserve just southeast of the Las Vegas Strip. We saw approximately 40 of these beautiful cinnamon colored birds. Interesting fact is that the males will molt these colors soon after they breed and become more of the brown colors like the female. They look very similar to other teal species and make it hard to distinguish what you are actually seeing. The Cinnamon Teal has a longer and wider bill than other teals to tell them apart.


American Wigeon

American Wigeon floating along at Sunset Park in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The American Wigeon gets around. While this bird is prominent in North America, it will migrate into Asia, Europe and South America. Even though they are quite common in the United States and Canada, their numbers are in decline. The best time to see these wigeons in the lower 48 states is between August and April. We spotted this one at Sunset Park in Las Vegas in April, 2017 on our last day of our Honeymoon.


Black-bellied Whistling Ducks

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks in Orlando Wetlands in Christmas, Florida.

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks plus an American Coot photobombing the scene at Orlando Wetlands in Christmas, Florida. Thought it appropriate to let you know they celebrate in Christmas 365 days a year. They are noisy ducks with a distinguished pink bill. They live in Florida year round but they migrate from South America to North America. They have began expanding their range further north in the U.S.


Little Blue Heron & Ruddy Turnstone

Little Blue Heron taking flight amongst the Ruddy Turnstones hoping someone will drop their bait on the dock at Reddie Point in Jacksonville, Florida.

Hanging out at the fishing pier at Reddie Point in Jacksonville, Florida along the St. Johns River. These 3 birds were hoping to get some dropped bait from the people fishing off the dock. The Little Blue Heron got tired of waiting while the patience of the Ruddy Turnstones maintained their stance.


Great Blue Heron

Little Blue Heron at Fort Desoto Park near St. Petersburg, Florida.

The majestic Great Blue Heron was patiently waiting while a Great Egret was indulging in someone’s bait bucket. I suppose trying to decide at what moment he would strike. Taken at Fort Desoto Park in Pinellas County near St. Petersburg, Florida. Fort Desoto is a must see if you are in the Tampa Bay area. Hot spot for birding.

Brown Pelican

Brown Pelican perched on the pilons under a bridge for some shade on a warm day in Tampa Bay.

Mr. Brown Pelican was hanging out under the bridge. I guess he forgot his sunscreen and needed to get into the shade. This is a juvenile so maybe he had been out trying to catch fish unsuccessfully. Either way, he was posed up beautifully for me to photograph.

Upcoming challenges can be found on my Bird Weekly Challenge Page.

Next time…Week #29 – Birds with Long Wingspans on January 1, 2021. Happy Holidays everyone!

Bird Weekly Round-Up – Week #27

Week #27 challenge was Birds with Red Feathers.

Disclaimer: If anyone has an issue with me using their photos in the round ups, please kindly let me know. I haven’t had anyone say anything, but I don’t want you to think I’m using your photographs for personal gain. I’m here to show what great work you are doing with your photography by showing you off in these posts.


As we approach the holidays, red and green are prominent branding colors for Christmas. If you celebrate a different holiday, I will wish you a happy one here. We celebrate Christmas and both my trees are filled with birds. Not real birds, except one year a Carolina Wren was in a potted plant that we brought in from freezing temps and didn’t know it was in there. It flew through our house and landed at the top of the Christmas Tree. Did I think to grab my camera? NO! I was so freaked out that the bird would hurt itself. We finally got it to fly back through our kitchen and towards the back door. It was unharmed as it finally made its escape. That happened on my red tree which has cardinal ornaments and all the ornaments that my kids made when they were young. It is actually a green tree with red and gold decor that is 28 years old and still looks awesome! Obviously artificial. I have allergies so a real tree is not an option. My other tree is the blue tree. Again, it is green but with blue and silver decor. Has all kinds of birds perched on it, plus bird ornaments all over.


Welcome to the newcomers, Ark and Brian. We now have 3 Lisa’s, 2 Brian’s and Partridge in a Pear Tree. Okay, it would be cool to see a Partridge in a Pear Tree but that Carolina Wren was pretty awesome.

Aletta’s Southern Double Collared Sunbird
Ark’s Greater Double Collared Sunbird
Maria’s Bohemian Waxwing
Lisa’s Red-winged Blackbird

I encourage you to visit these blogs if you haven’t already and see what amazing things they have going on. If I missed your post or there was a problem with a pingback, please let me know and I will be glad to add you to the list. Remember to pingback from my post of that week and not my page. Liking my page is encouraged!


Next up: Week #28: Birds near or in the water or snow. This will be the last Bird Weekly Challenge of 2020. Next week, I’m off for the holidays, but will do a round-up. Week #29 will resume on January 1, 2021! Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanzaa or whatever holiday you celebrate this holiday season. If you are Scrooge or the Grinch – Merry Christmas to you as well!

VISIT MY BIRD WEEKLY PAGE FOR A FULL LIST OF UPCOMING CHALLENGES AND RULES!

I look forward to seeing your creations this week!

Bird Weekly – Photo Challenge – Birds With Red Feathers

Welcome to Week #27 of the Bird Weekly Photo Challenge. Week #27 challenge is Birds with Red Feathers.

Thought as we approached the holidays, red was a good color! Now, I know many of you will post Northern Cardinals and I can’t wait. I have some today, myself. Next week is Birds near the water or snow. I’m hoping some of you have cardinals in the snow because I sure don’t.

The feature image is a Pileated Woodpecker. The old Woody Woodpecker himself. More information on him below. Keep scrolling!


Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinals are found in much of North America but not in most of the northwestern states. They can be seen off the mainland in Hawaii and Bermuda plus Central America. Within a couple of weeks of the time to build a nest, the female starts looking for possible sights. The male tags along behind her. He is her support system. The male and female will hold nesting material in their bills while calling back and forth as they assess each site. So when you hear one in one tree and another in a tree tweeting across the way and it is mating season, chances are they are in search mode for a home for their next brood.


Painted Bunting

Thought I would give you another look at the the Painted Bunting this week. This guy was gorging at the feeder located near the Ranger’s Station at Little Talbot Island State Park in Jacksonville, Florida.


House Finch

The House Finch is a North America bird that can also be found in Hawaii. They get along well with other song birds such as other finches, titmouse, chickadee, cardinals and others. They play nice with others and share the food at the feeders. They prefer the small, black oil sunflower seed. This bird was originally a bird of the western United States and Mexico. A few House Finches were turned loose on Long Island, New York in 1940 after many failed attempts to sell them as caged birds. They began to thrive and expanded their range into Canada and throughout the Eastern United States. The red of the male, seen above, comes from the pigments contained in its food during molt. The more pigment in the food, the redder the male. This one has been eating some dark pigment food. Females prefer to mate with the reddest males. Possibly because it gives them the greatest chance of a male to do his part in feeding the young.


Red-bellied Woodpecker

This Red-bellied Woodpecker let me go outside, sit on a rock about 6 feet from the feeders while he flew back and forth about 30 times from the feeders to the Palm Tree. He was stocking up for the winter. Totally oblivious that I was there or maybe just didn’t care. He was on a mission! This was my 15 minute break last Sunday and it was wonderful to be outside and capture this moment.


Red-headed Woodpecker

The Red-headed Woodpecker will occasionally visit feeders in the winter but I’ve never had one at my feeders. They prefer suet! We had to drive all the way to Georgia to the Okefenokee Wildlife Refuge to see this one. We saw 10 in all that day.


Red-winged Blackbird

The Red-winged Blackbird is predominant throughout North America. This male is quite striking in his silky black feathers with a spot of red and yellow, while the female is similar to most sparrows in color. She is a streaky brown. They can be found almost anywhere but are found in great numbers in marshes and wetlands. This one posed up right nicely while singing loudly at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge near Tallahassee, Florida.


Red Crossbill

The Red Crossbill was on my target list when we visited Yellowstone National Park in September, 2019. This bird is in the finch family but the the bottom and top bills overlap allowing them to break unopened cones that give them an advantage over other finch species. They are quite adaptable and will nest wherever and whenever there is an abundant amount of food, sometimes even in the winter. There were a pair by the stone bed along the Yellowstone River while we were having a picnic lunch. This was the best of the photos. Life bird right here!


Pileated Woodpecker

The Pileated Woodpecker is the largest woodpecker in North America. They will sometimes visit backyard bird feeders, especially for suet. If you have a dead or dying tree on your property, consider leaving it as long as it isn’t a danger to property damage. The woodpeckers, along with nuthatches will forage and roost in these dead or dying trees.


Vermilion Flycatcher

Talk about a red feathered bird. The Vermilion Flycatcher’s genus name is Pyrocephalus which translates to “fire-headed”. There are 12 subspecies of the Vermilion Flycatcher that are found in the southwestern US down to Chile in South America. The male will bring a gift, such as a butterfly or flashy insect to the female when courting.

Cassin’s Finch

Cassin’s Finch is similar to the House Finch in color, but is found in the mountains of western North America. In the winter, they will visit feeders with sunflower seeds. Like the House Finch, the red comes from the pigments garnered from eating colorful foods like orange berries or firethorn plants. We captured this guy at Mt. Charleston just outside of Las Vegas, Nevada. It was a life bird for us at the time in 2016.

Upcoming challenges can be found on my Bird Weekly Challenge Page.

Until next week…Week #28 – Birds near or in the Water or Snow

Bird Weekly Round-Up – Week #26

Week #26 challenge was Birds with “B” in the Title of the Name.

Disclaimer: If anyone has an issue with me using their photos in the round ups, please kindly let me know. I haven’t had anyone say anything, but I don’t want you to think I’m using your photographs for personal gain. I’m here to show what great work you are doing with your photography by showing you off in these posts.


“B” is for Birds…well…not just any birds. As V.J. put it, B…B…B…BIRDS! Welcome the newcomers this week, Tracy, Kammie & Alice! Blue Jays were the most popular throughout the North American birds. Bravo for the beautiful birds that have the letter B in their name.

My Belted Kingfisher

I encourage you to visit these blogs if you haven’t already and see what amazing things they have going on. If I missed your post or there was a problem with a pingback, please let me know and I will be glad to add you to the list. Remember to pingback from my post of that week and not my page. Liking my page is encouraged!


Next up: Week #27: Birds with Red Feathers

VISIT MY BIRD WEEKLY PAGE FOR A FULL LIST OF UPCOMING CHALLENGES AND RULES!

I look forward to seeing your creations this week!

Song Lyric Sunday – “The Snake Song” Billy Gilman

This week Jim Adams has prompted us with choosing songs pertaining to Alligator | Crocodile | Lizard | Snake | Turtle for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday. This week I chose “The Snake Song” by Billy Gilman.

The lyrics are quite quirky! I couldn’t find much about the song.

Written by Bobby Braddock, a native Floridian whose father was a citrus grower in Auburndale, Florida. As a youngster, Braddock learned to play piano and saxophone. He toured with rock and roll bands in Florida and the Southern states in the late 1950’s and 1960’s. He moved to Nashville, Tennessee at the age of 24 to pursue a career in country music. He has written some number one hits for many successful country artists. Too many to list, but he did receive Song of the Year award in 1980 & 1981 by the Country Music Academy for the George Jones classic tune, “He Stopped Loving Her Today” to which Braddock co-wrote the song with Curly Putman.


Billy Gilman, born William Wendell Gilman III is now 32 years old, became the youngest artist to ever have a top 40 single on the country chart at 11 years old with “One Voice”. “The Snake Song” was on his debut album One Voice which was released on June 20, 2000 by Epic Records. It was certified double platinum in the United States. He has put out a total of 5 albums. In 2016, he auditioned for NBC’s The Voice (U.S. Season 11) singing Adele’s song “When We Were Young” which impressed all four judges. Adam Levine was the first to turn his chair, then Blake Shelton and Miley Cyrus. Alicia Keys turned her chair near the end of the performance. When he introduced himself, Shelton & Cyrus said they recognized him from his childhood career with Shelton mentioning Gilman’s hit “One Voice”. Gilman chose to continue the competition with Adam Levine where he went on to finish runner-up.

I took my daughter to Gilman’s concert in 2000 when he performed as a headliner at the Florida State Fairgrounds. He was just getting over the flu, but came out and performed anyway. We were able to meet him, get photos and get an autograph, taking our chances that he wasn’t contagious. I can’t find the photos, but I can show you the signed CD. It’s a little on the rough side. Can’t believe it’s been 20 years!


“The Snake Song”

He swallowed a frog and hollered yum-yum
He slid down the hillside and darted his tongue
He entered the garden on this bright moonlight night
Then he stopped in his tracks, it was love at first sight
My skin is black, your skin is green
You dwell in a garden, I live by a stream
Although I'm short and stocky and you're long and lean
I've got a crush on you
Then he squeezed her tighter and tighter and tighter
I've got a crush on you
He said I'm a king snake, and you'll be my queen
With a butler and serpents, and your own private stream
And If you refuse me it would be such a shame
'Cause I'm so tired of doing my own fang
Then he squeezed her tighter
To excite her and delight her
Oh I've got a crush on you
(And I'll be back tomorrow)
Next day when he got there, a two-legged man
Was holding sweet green thing in his big human hand
A long jet of water shot out of her nose
Oh king snake had fallen in love with a hose
My skin is black, your skin is green
You dwell in a garden, I live by a stream
Although you're made of plastic, I think your fantastic!
Oh, I've got a crush on you
But i don't think it's going to work yeaaahh ooohh
Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: B Braddock
The Snake Song lyrics © Sony/atv Music Publishing 

Six Word Story – Cozy

Shweta Suresh Saturday Six Word Story Prompt (6WSP) #65 – December 5, 2020

Cozy

Crackling embers, radiant heat, cozy blanket.


#6WSP Saturday Six Word Story Prompt badge

Bird Weekly – Photo Challenge – Birds With a “B” in the Title of their Name

Welcome to Week #26 of the Bird Weekly Photo Challenge. Week #26 challenge is Birds beginning with a “B”. “B” is for Bird but not just any bird. It has to be like a Brittany or Barbara…A Barry or Brandon.

As long as one of the main words in the name of the bird begins with a “B” it is all good. Like Red-bellied Woodpecker or Lazuli Bunting.

The feature image is a Black-crowned Night Heron. They give us plenty of photo opportunities up close and personal when we visit Lettuce Lake Park in Tampa, Florida. It has been almost a year since our last trip down there and due to covid, we are not going down there anytime soon. I can’t even make a birding trip without seeing my kids and grandkids and that is just not an option right now. So I will have to enjoy my archives from the safety of my home.


Brown-headed Cowbird

The Brown-headed Cowbird is quite abundant throughout North America and can be seen as far South as Central America. The Cowbird, simply put belongs to the Blackbird family. The one above is a male. Neither the male or the female build nests. Instead, the female can lay up to three dozen eggs in a summer to which she deposits in other species nests for them to raise her young. Often times, the host bird’s own chicks don’t survive. Cowbirds have surged in numbers and I can see why when they just drop and go.


Painted Bunting

This Painted Bunting gave me a hard time. Not a decent shot of the bunch, but this was the best one. They can be seen at feeders after breeding season, starting in midsummer. This is a male which is full of color. The female is a bright green with a pale eyering. They breed in the Southeast and the south-central United States. We have them during spring and summer migration in Florida, but they winter in South Florida and further south.


Black & White Warbler

The Black-and-white Warbler is primarily found in North, Central and South America, plus throughout the Caribbean. This migratory bird is distinct with its black stripes running from the chest across the back, through the wings and atop the head. They creep along trees similar to a woodpecker and poke the bark with their bill for insects.


Black-capped Chickadee

Found in Central and North America, the Black-capped Chickadee is one of the first birds you will learn if you live in its region. They frequent bird feeders and are quite enamored with humans. Consider putting up a nesting box to attract a breeding pair. If you think you may do that, it is recommended to put a guard on the box to keep out predators like the Brown-headed Cowbird and birds of prey who will raid the nest for the eggs and/or the young.


Blue Grosbeak

The Blue Grosbeak is a large dark blue bunting with a thick silver bill and chestnut colored wingbars. These birds like the thicker habitat and can be hard to spot and equally hard to photograph. I spotted this one in Texas a few years ago and never got a clean shot. This was the best of the lot. They will visit feeders with grains and seeds in a shrubby backyard. They have come by my yard a time or two. They breed across the central and southern United States and Mexico, but live year-round in Central America. They will migrate throughout the Caribbean Islands.


Little Blue Heron

The Little Blue Heron is white in its first year. This is typically a good thing as they are learning to feed themselves and are tolerated a lot better by the Snowy Egrets. While feeding near the Egrets, the juvenile is more likely to catch fish than a mature bird in full blue plumage trying to feed around Egrets. The juvenile above was starting to get his blue color in and still learning how to land without looking extremely clumsy.


Pied-billed Grebe

The Pied-billed Grebe is rarely seen in flight because they are poor flyers. They are found throughout North America in marshes, lakes and ponds. They may lack the wings to fly, but they are talented divers and use their bills to kill and eat large crustaceans along with a large variety of fish, amphibians, insects and other invertebrates.


Western Bluebird

The Western Bluebird can be spotted in the Central to western parts of North America. I took this beautiful female in Montana last September. They are abundant in open fields in the mountains. They sit on low perches like this one and swoop lightly down to the ground to catch insects. We watched 3 of them do this for about 10 minutes. It was quite amazing. This is another bird that will nest in a nesting box if you are located in their habitat.


Belted Kingfisher

The Belted Kingfisher can be spotted along streams and shorelines of North America. They have a piercing loud rattle call that you will often hear before you see them. They are wicked fast and do not cooperate when you are trying to photograph them. The above photo is the best one I’ve ever gotten.

Bonus – Brown Pelicans


Just a bonus of a small flock of Brown Pelicans flying over us at Little Talbot Island State Park beach this summer. MY FAVORITE BIRD!

Upcoming challenges can be found on my Bird Weekly Challenge Page.

Until next week…Week #27 – Birds with Red Feathers

Bird Weekly Round-Up – Week #25

Week #25 challenge was Your choice in color and black & white or sepia.

Disclaimer: If anyone has an issue with me using their photos in the round ups, please kindly let me know. I haven’t had anyone say anything, but I don’t want you to think I’m using your photographs for personal gain. I’m here to show what great work you are doing with your photography by showing you off in these posts.


Last week’s challenge was more about learning new ways to do things in WordPress using a color and monochrome photo. The birds were just a bonus and since it is Bird Weekly, still the focus of our little world. You guys really outdid yourselves for this challenge. There were some great techniques in how you presented your birds. Hope to see more in the future when you share your wonderful photography with us. We will do another monochrome challenge in a couple of months. Everyone seems to love it and I enjoy the creativity it offers.

Time doesn’t allow for me to highlight your beautiful images this week of your wonderful photos. The holiday season is here and my shop has been very busy! YAY for that! I’m working 9-10 hour days doing it and the blog is taking a backseat at the moment. I’m still trying to keep up with writing a blog a day. Bird Weekly will continue as planned.

If you have a moment, I’d love for you to check out my Shop Page and maybe give it a like. There is a link to visit the shop if you want to poke around.

I encourage you to visit these blogs if you haven’t already and see what amazing things they have going on. If I missed your post or there was a problem with a pingback, please let me know and I will be glad to add you to the list. Remember to pingback from my post of that week and not my page. Liking my page is encouraged!


Next up: Week #26: Birds beginning with the letter “B”

VISIT MY BIRD WEEKLY PAGE FOR A FULL LIST OF UPCOMING CHALLENGES AND RULES!

I look forward to seeing your creations this week!

FOTD – Impatiences – Haiku

Patience in pink bloom.
I'm an impatient flower
I sure am pretty!

Cee’s FOTD Challenge

Cee's Flower of the Day logo

#WordlessWednesday – Beach Sunset

Wordless Wednesday


Secret – Haiku

Value the moment
a thought skewed, tortured, it slips
secrets without grace.

Delicate friendship
refined in one single act
trust shattered, instant.

Permanent damage
no reconciliation
compromised, destroyed.

Written for: Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 333 Grace & Slip

Water Water Everywhere #53 – Fernandina

Photos by Jez is the new host of WWE that is a weekly challenge posted on Monday.

Walking along the beach at Fort Clinch State Park In Fernandina, Florida at sunset. A shrimp boat was coming in or maybe going out on a night run. Birds were all over the boat while Pelicans sat and observed from the rock jetty.

Song Lyric Sunday – “I Like Birds” by Eels

This week Jim Adams has prompted us with choosing songs pertaining to Bird | Cat | Dog | Fish | Pet for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday. This week I chose 2 songs. The first one is by Eels called “I Like Birds”. The second one is “Bird Dog” by The Everly Brothers. Two very different songs but I couldn’t make up my mind.

“I like Birds” was written by Eels front man, Mark Everett. It was dedicated to his mother who died of lung cancer in 1998. On January 10, 2008, Everett told Sun Newspaper why the song is “tinged with sadness”.

“Well, s–t happens. Life is happy and sad and all the shades of grey in between. I just try to reflect all that stuff as best I can. My mother was an avid birdwatcher. She had a lot of bird books and feeders that I brought with me from her house. I set up the feeders in my yard and I read the books. ‘I Like Birds’ was a way of staying connected to her.” Mark Everett

The song was on the soundtrack of the 2011 movie, “The Big Year” starring Steve Martin, Jack Black, & Owen Wilson. The story is about 3 guys who are supposedly not doing a big year and are out on the hunt to see as many species of birds in 365 days starting on January 1st. The comic relief is contagious. This is the movie that got me into being a serious birder. I’d love to do a big year someday.

“I Like Birds”

I can't look at the rocket launch
The trophy wives of the astronauts
And I won't listen to their words
'Cause I like
Birds
I don't care for walkin' downtown
Crazy auto-car gonna mow me down
Look at all the people like cows in a herd
Well, I like
Birds
If you're small and on a search
I've got a feeder for you to perch on
I can't stand in line at the store
The mean little people are such a bore
But it's alright if you act like a turd
'Cause I like
Birds
If you're small and on a search
I've got a feeder for you to perch on
If you're small and on a search
I've got a feeder for you to perch on
I've got a feeder for you to perch on
If you're small and on a search
I've got a feeder for you to perch on
I've got a feeder for you to perch on
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Mark O. Everett
I Like Birds lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group 

Bird Dog was a favorite of mine when I was a kid. My Uncle Earl had bird dogs for hunting. Those hounds went everywhere with him. I pay personal homage to my family who provided for their families the old fashioned way. They farmed, fished and hunted to keep food on the table. There was a lot of drama in the family that resonates the lyrics as well.


“Bird Dog” was written by Boudleaux Bryant and was released by The Everly Brothers on July 28, 1958. It reached #1 on the Billboard Country Chart and peaked at #2 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. It also peaked at #2 for 3 weeks on the R&B charts. Talk about a crossover hit! It also peaked at #1 on the Australian Singles Chart, Canadian Singles Chart and United Kingdom (Record Mirror). It was #2 on the United Kingdom (NME).

Boudleaux Bryant, along with his wife, Felice became the first professional songwriting team. They wrote numerous songs for The Everly Brothers. Their resume includes more than 6,000 songs and over 1,000 recordings. They provided successful tunes for Bob Dylan, Johnnie Ray, Frankie Laine, Tony Bennett, Al Martino, The Grateful Dead, Sarah Vaughan, Billy Eckstine, Della Reese, Simon and Garfunkel, Dean Martin, Dinah Shore, Percy Faith, Al Hirt, Rosemary Clooney, Roy Orbison, Buddy Holly and so many others. All these artists are indebted to this talented duo. They also wrote the very popular, “Rocky Top” which was adopted as the state song for Tennessee in 1982.

Felice had no musical training, but all her family members sang and played instruments by ear. She would write song lyrics in her quiet times. In 1945, Felice and Boudleaux married and combined their gifts to write some of the most beloved songs in history. Their first great hit was “Bye, Bye Love” by The Everly Brothers.

Boudleaux died at the age of 67 in 1987, but Felice continued to write songs on her own following her husband’s death. She was honored by the Nashville Arts Foundation with the “Living Legend Award”. Felice died in 2003 at the age of 77.


“Bird Dog”

Johnny is the joker (he's a bird)
A very funny joker (he's a bird)
But when he jokes my honey (he's a dog)
His jokin' ain't so funny (what a dog)
Johnny is the joker that's been tryin' to steal my baby (he's a bird dog)

Johnny sings a love song (like a bird)
He sings the sweetest love song (you ever heard)
But when he sings to my gal (what a howl)
To me it's just a wolf dog (on the prowl)
Johnny wants to fly away and puppy love my baby (he's a bird dog)

[Chorus]
Hey bird dog, get away from my quail
Hey bird dog, you're on the wrong trail
Bird dog you better leave my lovey dove alone
Hey bird dog, get away from my chick
Hey bird dog, you better get away quick
Bird dog you better find a chicken little of your own

Johnny kissed the teacher (he's a bird)
He tip-toed up to reach her (he's a bird)
Well, he's the teachers pet now (he's a dog)
What he wants he can get now (what a dog)
He even made the teacher let him sit next to my baby (he's a bird dog)

[Chorus]
Hey bird dog, get away from my quail
Hey bird dog, you're on the wrong trail
Bird dog you better leave my lovey dove alone
Hey bird dog, get away from my chick
Hey bird dog, you better get away quick
Bird dog you better find a chicken little of your own

He's a bird

I’ll Connect You

Written for VJ’s Weekly Challenge #122 – the phone call.

   "This is the operator, I have a collect call from John Doe, do you accept the charges?"

Sarah was trying to decide what to do.  She didn't know a John Doe.  She didn't know anyone by the name of John period.

   "Do you accept the charges, mam?"

Her curiosity got the better of her and she said "Yes, I'll accept the charges" feeling as though she was about to get punched in the gut.

   "Hello", Sarah said apprehensively.

   "Hi Sarah, it's me Charlie".

   "Charlie, why did you tell the operator you were John Doe? Why are you calling me collect and how did you know I'd accept the charges anyway?.

   "Listen, I don't have much time. I will explain everything when I see you, but for now, I need you to go into your study. Go to the 3rd bookcase and take down "Moby Dick".

"What? Why?", Sarah headed to her study while asking impatiently for answers. As she entered into the room, the sun was shining from the double windows and like a beacon lit up the bookshelf that held the book.  "Okay, I've got it, now what?".

   "Turn to page 128 and read off the numbers that are marked on the page".

Sarah was totally confused. "Numbers?"

   "Yes, I need you to read off those numbers and quickly".

Sarah read off the random numbers. Charlie verified them by reading them back. Sarah acknowledged he had read them back correctly. She was about to ask more questions when Charlie cut her off before anything else came out of her mouth.

   "Thanks! Gotta go! By the way...this conversation never happened and burn the book!"

WORK OF FICTION BY LISA COLEMAN

Bird Weekly – Photo Challenge – Birds in color and Mono

Welcome to Week #25 of the Bird Weekly Photo Challenge. Week #25 challenge is a twofer or more! Share the same photo of the a bird of your choice in color, black & white or whatever monochrome color you choose. You can also use selective color or sepia tone. I use Photoshop for photo editing, but you can use the settings on your phone or whatever you choose. I honestly don’t know what is out there because I’ve been using photoshop for almost 20 years.

This week I wanted to show you different uses for the blocks that Word Press offers in case you have never used them before. I also wanted to prove that not every color image can be turned into black & white or have filters added to it and LOOK GOOD. Some of these photos you may have seen. I’m cheating a little this week as it has been busy with Thanksgiving yesterday.

Have fun discovering new blocks and techniques to show off your awesome photos. There are no wrong answers here and I can’t wait to see what birds you have this week!


Double-crested Cormorant

This block is called Image Compare. With this block, you can upload two images to get the effect above. The slider reveals each photo. You can do this with two completely different images with different subject matter as long as they are the same size. I chose to use it with providing the color version and a selective color black & white. I first saw this on a Square Challenge posted by Becky at Life of B. Becky hosts the Squares challenge that is a quarterly challenge. Next one comes up in January. She will announce the theme towards the end of December. Hope you will go visit her page and follow her. We have a lot of fun with Squares.


Snowy Egret

The block above is the Gallery block. I use this block type all the time, especially when i do the roundup.


Willet & Sanderling

This block is the Tiled Gallery which gives you a bit of a different layout.


Belted Kingfisher

The Belted Kingfisher is a hard bird to photograph!

The Belted Kingfisher is a hard bird to photograph!

With this block, I had to create my artwork as one image rather than uploading two separate images. This is the Media & Text block. The default font for the text is 36 point or large. I used 2 different font sizes to give you visual options. You can set the justification to right, left or center. You have the same editing abilities with changing the text color and making them bold or italic. You can also align the block the way you want it as well as I’ve shown a left justify and a right justify.


Limpkin

This block is a Collage. The Limpkin photos above were all taken in one photo shoot. I played around with these to make a nature photo (the last one), mono, grayscale, sepia and my favorite color purple. So unnatural looking but it was fun to go completely outside my comfort zone. Unfortunately, this block doesn’t always look in your designer the same as on your page.


Yellow-throated Warbler

This block is the group block. You can change the size, the distance between the photos called the gutter and even round the corners. If you want a caption for each photo, you have to turn on the toggle called Captions.


Slideshow

The slideshow block allows you to add multiple images that your readers can scroll through that are all the same size.

I’m not pretending to know all the ins and outs of WordPress but I’m having fun figuring them out. I just wanted to share some things that I have learned and hope you will try them if you haven’t already. Next week I will be back to my informative self with my birds. If you know something I don’t, please share with the rest of the class. Have fun this week and can’t wait to see what you come up with.


Upcoming challenges can be found on my Bird Weekly Challenge Page.

Until next week…Week #26 – Birds beginning with the Letter “B”

Bird Weekly Round-Up – Week #24

Week #24 challenge was Birds that are hunted or consumed by humans.

Disclaimer: If anyone has an issue with me using their photos in the round ups, please kindly let me know. I haven’t had anyone say anything, but I don’t want you to think I’m using your photographs for personal gain. I’m here to show what great work you are doing with your photography by showing you off in these posts.


Last week’s birds were inspired by our American Thanksgiving. Happy Thanksgiving to all who celebrated yesterday! I didn’t eat turkey which is tradition. Instead, we had ham. Organic of course! Quite tasty considering I’m having issues eating pork, except bacon! It was a nice meal and we took take-out to my daughter & her boyfriend who are in the process of packing & moving.

I encourage you to visit their blogs and see what amazing things they have going on. If I missed your post or there was a problem with a pingback, please let me know and I will be glad to add you to the list. Remember to pingback from my post of that week and not my page. Liking my page is encouraged!

Waterfowl


Turkeys


Doves


Quail & Pheasant


Goose & Chicken


Next up: Week #25: Your choice birds in color and black & white. This post will be different than all the rest and I hope you have fun with it.

VISIT MY BIRD WEEKLY PAGE FOR A FULL LIST OF UPCOMING CHALLENGES AND RULES!

I look forward to seeing your creations this week!

An American Thanksgiving

Did you know that turkey wasn’t on the menu at the first American Thanksgiving? Colonist arrived from England on the Mayflower in 1620 and in celebration of a successful harvest, a feast lasting 3 days between September & November took place.

On November 5, 1782 the Continental Congress proclaimed Thursday, 28 November as “a day of Solemn Thanksgiving to God for all His Mercies…”

On October 3, 1789, George Washington created the first Thanksgiving Day designation by the national government of the United States of America for all citizens to observe this day of thanks. This was a year to year declaration. John Adams, the second President of the United States declared Thanksgivings in 1798 & 1799. However, Thomas Jefferson was skeptic of divine intervention and did not declare thanksgiving days during his presidency. The tradition was renewed in 1814 with James Madison. Madison declared two thanksgivings in 1815, neither were in the fall. For many years after that, it was left up to the governors of each state to declare thanksgiving if they chose to. In 1863, Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving Day to be celebrated on the 26th, the final Thursday of November. Since that time, Thanksgiving has been observed annually in the United States.

On, June 28, 1870, President Ulysses S. Grant signed into law the Holidays Act that made Thanksgiving a federal holiday in Washington D.C, one that was appointed federally by the President. The law did not extend outside of Washington D.C. An act by Congress on January 6, 1885 made Thanksgiving a paid holiday for federal employees throughout the United States. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the resolution on December 26, 1941 establishing the fourth Thursday in November a Federal Thanksgiving Day holiday. In 1942, Roosevelt (FDR) signed into law that the fourth Thursday in November was a permanent holiday and no longer at the discretion of the President.

Since that time, Americans and immigrants have observed giving thanks where families come together to be thankful for all things in their lives. 2020 has not been nice to a lot of people including yours truly. I may have lost my job, but I am thankful that Frank and I are healthy and no one in my immediate family has been burdened with the repercussions of Covid. I pray for those who have lost loved ones and want to express how thankful I am to the first responders, nurses, doctors and anyone that is on the front lines such as teachers. You are the real heroes!

Last Friday, I hosted the Bird Weekley topic of Birds that are Hunted or Consumed by Humans. We are not doing a traditional Thanksgiving this year. NO TURKEY! Our menu consists of Ham, Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, Cornbread Muffins, Pumpkin Cheesecake Pie and Pumpkin Roll Cake.

Pumpkin Cheesecake Pie

Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!

#WordlessWednesday – Mourning Dove

Wordless Wednesday


The View – Haiku

To see through one's eye
the vision of life's wonder
viewing true beauty.

Written for: Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 333 Life and View

Water Water Everywhere #52 – Tampa Bay

Photos by Jez is the new host of WWE that is a weekly challenge posted on Monday.

Tampa Bay where Manatees can be seen most of the time in Apollo Beach, Florida.

This is a view of Tampa Bay at the Tampa Electric’s Manatee viewing area in Apollo Beach, Florida. The lumps in the water are the Manatees coming up for air which they do every 20 minutes or less. They are large marine mammals known as sea cows. They prefer warm water and in the winter time will be found in shallow rivers where there are spring heads.

Song Lyric Sunday – “Husbands & Wives” by Roger Miller & Others

This week Jim Adams has prompted us with choosing songs pertaining to Fiance’| Husband | Lover | Wife for this week’s Song Lyric Sunday. This week I chose a Roger Miller song called “Husbands and Wives”.

Husbands and Wives is a mid-tempo waltz in the key of C major. It is about a couple who is breaking up. With both parties having too much pride in themselves to reconcile.

“Husbands and Wifes was written and first recorded by American country music singer Roger Miller. It was released in February 1966 and was a crossover hit, reaching # 10 on the U.S. country and Adult Contemporary charts. Reached the Top 40 on the pop charts as well.

Wayne Newton covered the song in 1968 where it reached #28 on the U.S. Adult Contemporary chart and #97 on Cash Box.

David Frizzell and Shelly West covered the song in 1981 as a duet. It reached the Top 20 on the country singles chart.

Brooks & Dunn covered the song on their 1998 album If You See Her, featuring lead vocals from Ronnie Dunn. It was the third single from this album, reaching the top of the country singles chart in December 1998. It was also their first Top 40 hit on the pop charts, peaking at #36 on the Billboards Hot 100. In addition, it peaked at #2 on the Canada Country Tracks.


“Husbands & Wifes”

Two broken hearts lonely looking like houses
Where nobody lives
Two people each having so much pride inside
Neither side forgives
The angry words spoken in haste
Such a waste of two lives
It's my belief pride is the chief cause in the decline
Of the number of husbands and wives
A woman and a man
A man and a woman
Some can and some can't and some can't
Two broken hearts lonely looking houses
Where nobody lives
Two people each having so much pride inside
Neither side forgives
The angry words spoken in haste
Such a waste of two lives
It's my belief pride is the chief cause in the decline
Of the number of husbands and wives
It's my belief pride is the chief cause in the decline
Of the number of husbands and wives
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Roger Miller
Husbands and Wives lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Six Word Story – Fishy

Shweta Suresh Saturday Six Word Story Prompt (6WSP) #65 – November 21, 2020

Fishy

Clear eyed fish don’t smell fishy.


#6WSP Saturday Six Word Story Prompt badge

Bird Weekly – Photo Challenge – Hunted or Consumed by Humans

Welcome to Week #24 of the Bird Weekly Photo Challenge. Week #24 challenge gives way to birds that are hunted or consumed by humans.

The feature image shows a couple of wild turkeys grazing at Salt Springs along the road leading to the boat ramp in Fort McCoy, Florida which is inside the Ocala National Forest. Next Thursday, November 26th is the day we celebrate Thanksgiving. While I’m not a vegetarian, my diet is about 85% vegetarian. Not because of how I feel about birds, but because I haven’t been able to consume chicken or pork (minus bacon) since I had my gallbladder out seven years ago. It doesn’t smell or taste good to me. Many weird things happened after that surgery. My taste buds totally whacked out. For example, I didn’t like avocados or guacamole. Now it is one of my favorite foods. Since we only eat turkey once per year in my house, I can force myself to eat a bit of it with some cornbread stuffing and gravy. I hope many of you are vigilant about gatherings and social distancing. Frank & I normally travel and go birding during this time, but it is not on the agenda this year. No flights, no family gatherings. My daughter & her boyfriend may come over, but it will not be typical. We will still be thankful for what we have and that no one in our immediate family has been infected. STAY SAFE EVERYONE!

Birds are hunted for sport and for eating. While my opinion is exceptionally one-sided, I do not condone the killing of birds for sport. I know that it is necessary to thin species out like big wild game such as deer and elk, but I don’t see the point of it unless it is to put food on the table. Many of our favorite edibles are farm raised. For many years, these birds have been kept in small quarters and not allowed to graze and be happy birds. In the last few decades, awareness has shown new trends of “grass fed”, “organic fed” “no hormones or antibiotics” and “happy free range” which indicates these birds have a happy life while they are here. It keeps them from being stressed out and makes our food a lot tastier.


Wild Turkey

Wild Turkey getting ready to spar.

Sorry this is blurry. It is a photo (yes actual printed photo) from when I was shooting film. Couldn’t find the negatives. Took a photo with my IPhone. Best I could get. These two started sparring after I took the shot. The shot with my Nikon, not a gun. It was such a great memory, I had to share it.

I saved this long-legged bird for this week in honor of Thanksgiving. They are large plump birds that can be 43.3-45.3 inches tall (110-115 cm). They are best known for their gobble. They travel in flocks and their diet consists of nuts, berries, insects and snails they forage on the ground. They live in mature forests but can be seen on the edge of forests and along roads. They were hunted in excess, but have been reintroduced to habitat and are thriving once again. Every state has a “turkey season” for hunters. They receive a quota and cannot kill more than they are alloted.

Wild Turkey in Salt Springs, Ocala National Forest, Fort McCoy, Florida.

8…9…10…Ready or Not, here I come? Are you hiding behind the tree? Peek-a-boo I see you!


Note: I did not shoot this video. I got it off of YouTube to show you the sound they make.

Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes foraging at Viera Wetlands in Viera, Florida.

Sandhill Cranes are hunted in portions of Colorado, Kansas, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas and Wyoming. These states are all in the Central Flyway. Nebraska is the only state in this migratory route that doesn’t have a Sandhill Crane sport hunting season. In Alabama, hunting season has come back but residents are only allowed to kill three per permit. It is said that these birds taste like pork chops.


Northern Bobwhite

Northern Bobwhite seen at the entrance of Okefenokee Wildlife Management Area in Folkston, Georgia.

The Northern Bobwhite has been on the decline and the Masked Bobwhite is extinct in Arizona and on the endangered list in Mexico. This guy is native to Canada, the United States, Mexico and Cuba. Northern Bobwhites have been introduced in the Caribbean, Europe and Asia. It is member of the group species called New World quails. They are distinguished by their bob-white whistle. Their buff colors often camouflage them to their surroundings. If we hadn’t heard this one and two others in nearby trees, we would have never spotted it. It was at the entrance to Okefenokee Wildlife Management Area.


Gambel’s Quail

Gambel's Quail seen running around the grounds at Lake Mead in Nevada.

Gambel’s Quail are ground-huggers that would rather run than fly. They are fast too! They are found in desert climates in the western part of the United States and Mexico. Both the male and female sport the forward-facing crest that is shaped like a comma, however the male has the distinguished black face. This quail is hard to hunt because of its habitat for the human and/or hunting dogs. A lot of cacti, thorny mesquite trees and venomous snakes make it a difficult task. Not to mention, hunters prefer to shoot birds that fly and the Gambel’s Quail prefers not to do that.


Hunting Chart

New York Waterfowl Hunting Charge for 2020-2021.
2020-2021 New York Waterfowl Hunting Chart

Just an example of how different states work for limiting the hunting of certain birds at certain times.


Mallard Duck

Mallard Duck

Duck is a delicacy in the culinary world. I’ve never eaten duck and never intend to. They are fatty and just don’t whet my appetite. I mean look at that face! The Mallard is a dabbling duck and is the ancestor to nearly all domestic ducks except the Muscovy Duck.


American Coot

American Coot hanging out at Merritt Island Wildlife Management in Titusville, Florida.

The American Coot swims like a duck and looks similar to one, however they don’t have webbed feet. They can be found by the thousands with other waterfowl. They call North America, Central America and Northern South America home. You can find them all over the Caribbean Islands as well.


Canada Goose

Canada Geese have expanded their range in recent years. We have been seeing more of this species in Florida than ever before. They are now on the list of birds that can be hunted in Florida. A full list can be found at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission here.


Chicken

Hen balancing on a wood door in the chicken coop at Tree Hill Nature Preserve in Jacksonville, Florida.

The colonel at Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) has made a living off of fried chicken. Not only do we eat chickens, but their eggs are a great source of protein as well. The Washington Post reported in April, 2019, that Americans are eating approximately 279 eggs per person per year. That’s a lot of eggs! It may be higher now with the pandemic because more people are home cooking. Chicken eggs are the most prevalent, but quail eggs are becoming more popular by professional chefs.


Upcoming challenges can be found on my Bird Weekly Challenge Page.

Until next week…Week #24 – Birds hunted or consumed

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